Welcome to the Biotage Flash Purification Blogs.

    Why do I see more peaks than I expect with flash column chromatography?

    January 8, 2020 at 3:23 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Chromatography Fundamentals, Solvents, Troubleshooting and Optimization, Normal Phase, Isolera

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    Are you observing more chromatographic peaks than you expect compared to TLC or other assessment data?  Well, it could be that your method is separating some isomers or, it could be that there is an actual method issue.

    In this post I will discuss what could cause a method issue and suggest some ideas as to how to fix it.

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    So, how does an ELSD work?

    January 7, 2020 at 9:06 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Detector

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    Evaporative Light-Scattering Detection, or ELSD for short, is a technology used with liquid chromatography to see UV-transparent (and UV-absorbing) compounds. In a previous post I talked about some applications where ELSD is not only useful, but required.

    In this post, I will explain how an ELSD is configured and functions.

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    5 Tips on extending reversed-phase flash chromatography cartridge life

    January 7, 2020 at 8:51 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Reversed-phase, SPE

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    With reversed-phase flash column chromatography becoming increasingly popular for routine purification, understanding how to make the cartridges last (since they cost more) is important to know. 

    In this post I will mention a few tips to prolong reversed-phase cartridge life.

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    Can I use TLC for reversed-phase flash column chromatography method development?

    January 7, 2020 at 8:49 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Chromatography Fundamentals, Reversed-phase, Troubleshooting and Optimization, Media and Resin, HPLC

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    I am often asked why reversed-phase TLC data does not translate well to reversed-phase flash column chromatography.  There are several reasons for this and in this post I will attempt to explain the challenges associated with reverse-phase TLC as a method development tool for reversed-phase flash chromatography.

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    Does Size Really Matter in Flash Chromatography? Part 2

    January 7, 2020 at 8:46 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Chromatography Fundamentals, Sfär, Scale-Up, Normal Phase

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    In a previous post I talked about column size, specifically long-thin versus short-fat and the impact of the cartridge’s dimensions on purification performance. With that comparison I showed that in preparative chromatography, purification efficiency is more about the amount of silica than column dimensions. Cartridges of different dimensions containing the same amount of the same media will provide the same separation efficiency.

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    Does size really matter in flash chromatography? Part 1

    January 7, 2020 at 8:43 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Chromatography Fundamentals, Normal Phase

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    Yes, the title is a bit salacious but it got your attention, didn’t it? I believe this is a topic worthy of discussion as it relates to flash chromatography for purification because many chemists believe longer but thinner columns perform better than short, wide columns.  The facts of the matter may surprise you.

    In this post I discuss the impact that cartridge dimensions have on purification performed using flash purification.

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    So, which detector should I use for flash column chromatography?

    January 3, 2020 at 3:38 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Reversed-phase, Detector, Normal Phase

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    In my role as senior technical specialist at Biotage I am often asked about compound detection options. For most flash chromatography methods, UV is the default detection tool since many compounds do absorb some UV light.

    Diode array UV detectors provide chemists choices in wavelength selection providing the ability to widen or narrow the wavelength range needed to detect specific compounds and enhance their sensitivity.

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