Welcome to the Biotage Flash Purification Blogs.

    How do I scale-up my reversed-phase flash chromatography method?

    April 27, 2020 at 2:53 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Chromatography Fundamentals, Reversed-phase, Scale-Up

    1 Comment

    Scaling up reversed-phase flash chromatography methods is often necessary as reaction scale increases. This is especially true when other non-chromatographic purification techniques do not work or meet purity and/or yield needs.

    Read More

    This might actually be a good time to choose a reliable partner

    April 27, 2020 at 9:19 AM / by flashadmin posted in Selekt, Cost, Technical Service, Quality of Biotage Products

    0 Comments

    Sometimes we find ourselves having to make decisions fast, and act even faster - especially in situations like the one we live in today, where there is a high degree of uncertainty.  In this kind of situation it is ideal to find a partner that is willing to share the risk with us, so that the long-term consequences of a decision made in times of uncertainty are not going to make us regret our choice when things get back to normal.

    Read More

    5 Steps to successful flash chromatography

    April 20, 2020 at 10:15 AM / by Bob Bickler posted in Amine, Chromatography Fundamentals, Reversed-phase, Solvents, Media and Resin, Loading Techniques, Normal Phase, Pillar Page

    0 Comments

    The bane of organic synthesis for most chemists is purification rather than synthesis. Synthetic reaction mixtures are rarely devoid of impurities so some type of purification is necessary.  Most often flash chromatography is used but for many chemists, it is less well understood than their chemical reaction and provides some level of anxiety.

    In this post, I will summarize the five most important steps to creating a successful flash chromatography method and thus the anxiety associated with it.

    Read More

    Does a longer flash column really provide better purification?

    April 17, 2020 at 9:30 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Chromatography Fundamentals, Sfär, Scale-Up, Cost, Normal Phase

    6 Comments

    This is an interesting question that I am asked from time to time. There does seem to be two camps in which chemists reside – one believing longer and thinner columns provide better separations and the other preferring shorter and fatter columns to do the same chromatography.

    Which is right? That is a question I will try to answer based on my own data.

    Read More

    Biotage Selekt in Polymer Material Research at Konstanz University

    April 16, 2020 at 3:21 PM / by Greg Saunders posted in Selekt, Customer case

    0 Comments

    The Biotage® Selekt Flash purification system is designed for the rapid and simple isolation of target molecules from complex mixtures. Typically, this is seen in the area of drug discovery, where large numbers of molecules are synthesized in order to find active pharmaceutical ingredients for future pharmaceutical use. However, flash purifications can be employed in any work that involves the requirement to purify compounds, which is most branches of chemistry.

    Read More

    Understanding silica – why matching TLC and flash silica is important for good flash column chromatography

    April 15, 2020 at 12:00 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Chromatography Fundamentals, Solvents, Sfär, Media and Resin, Normal Phase

    6 Comments

    Recently, I posted an article explaining why high performance TLC plates are not needed for method development for high-performance flash chromatography.  Based on some excellent feedback, I see a need to discuss silica chemistry and its impact on chromatography.

    Read More

    How and when to insert an isocratic hold in flash column chromatography

    April 13, 2020 at 7:00 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Chromatography Fundamentals, Solvents

    3 Comments

    For many chemists using generic linear gradients and even gradients based on TLC the purification results often are not selective enough to separate all of the compounds in their mix.  This is especially true if your target has a closely eluting impurity. One method used to try and increase resolution is the use of an isocratic hold or gradient pause during purification.

    In this post I examine the use of the isocratic hold to determine how well it works and when/if it should be inserted into a gradient method.

    Read More

    How do I remove an annoying MS TIC background?

    April 10, 2020 at 2:52 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Chromatography Fundamentals, Troubleshooting and Optimization, Sfär, Detector, Normal Phase, V-10, Isolera

    2 Comments

    Have you ever run flash column chromatography with mass detection (Flash-MS) and observed the total ion current or TIC increase during the purification only to find that there was no discernible compound contributing to the effect?

    In this post I discuss how I came across this issue and the solution I found to work.

    Read More

    Scaling up chromatography to the manufacturing plant

    April 8, 2020 at 2:39 PM / by Greg Saunders posted in Chromatography Fundamentals, Scale-Up

    0 Comments

    Chromatography is a common tool of the chemistry laboratory, and most chemists involved in synthesis have a good idea how automated flash purification system work on the lab bench. However, knowing how to take purifications from the laboratory to a manufacturing environment is a different question altogether.

    Read More

    How does an alkaline pH affect normal-phase flash chromatography separations?

    April 7, 2020 at 6:25 PM / by Bob Bickler posted in Amine, Chromatography Fundamentals, Solvents, Sfär, Normal Phase, Isolera

    0 Comments

    The products of organic synthesis are designed with specific functional groups in order to possess desired properties. Depending on the compound’s functionality, it can be neutral, acidic, or basic as determined by a compound measurement called pKa or acid dissociation constant. Compounds with low pKa are typically acidic while those with high pKa tend to be basic. Compounds with a pKa near 7 are deemed neutral.

    Read More